Paris: The City of Light

Paris: The City of Light

  • May
  • 20th
  • 2016
  • Jessica Jehorek

This post originally appeared on The Overnight Commute on April 27, 2016.

The Overnight Commute

Home to some of the most notable and iconic museums and architectural landmarks, the city has its way of keeping you captivated throughout your stay and will surely have you eager to return.

Prime Time For Travel

The climate is quite mild though can be somewhat wet, but is mainly pleasant with beautiful summer days containing plenty of sunshine. Spring is often referred to as the best time to visit Paris, but the seasons of summer and fall are equally as wonderful from a weather perspective.  Know that you may encounter some rain in the springtime, but they are usually showers that quickly pass.

Paris is a major European air transportation hub and has the 5th busiest airport system in the world.  There are three international airports: Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Beauvais-Tillé, and Paris-Orly, though the one most commonly used for international travel is Charles de Gaulle (CDG).  CDG is often referred to as a very confusing airport, but savvy travelers should not have a problem navigating its system.

The Overnight Commute

Exploring the Arrondissements

Paris is divided into 20 different arrondissements (or administrative districts) that form a clockwise spiral around the center of the city.  The city is split, fairly centrally, by the Seine River (so you may at times hear “Right Bank” vs. “Left Bank”).

Though each arrondissement has its own charm, below are a few areas that you simply cannot miss during your stay.

1st arrondissement
A first-time visitor’s comfort zone, this area makes for an exceptional introduction to the city.  Here you will find the Tuileries, Place Vendôme, the Louvre, and a distant but stunning view of the Eiffel Tower.  Certainly one of the most popular arrondissements to stay in.

6th arrondissement
This area is dominated by the historic district of Saint-Germain-des-Prés as well as the Palais du Luxembourg. Choose this area to spend a part of your afternoon relaxing on the patio of a café. Two of the most famous are Les Deux Magots and Café de Flore (and are conveniently located right next to each other).

8th arrondissement
The 8th is another favorite area to stay in, though this arrondissement is probably the most expensive. Shop along the Champs-Élysées while admiring the Arc de Triomphe. You will also come across the Place de la Concorde numerous times during your stay in Paris, and do take some time to admire the statues at each of the eight angles of the square which all represent a different city in France.

18th arrondissement
An area of Paris most widely known of the historic district of Montmartre. You simply cannot pass this up. Climb the hill as the sun sets, admire the Sacré Coeur basilica, wander through the tiny streets to window shop, and end with a meal at one of the many little traditional French brasseries. Though picturesque and therefore very popular (especially among tourists), beware of pickpockets and avoid walking the streets late at night.

The Overnight Commute

Venue Spotlight

-The Montebello-

Consider hosting a special reception or dinner on the Seine aboard the Montebello, or even hold a meeting on the lower deck.

CAPACITIES
100 reception / 70 seated
*  For a reception on the terrace and dinner on the main deck, 60 guests is recommended

-Pavillon Cambon Capucines-

With its perfect location amongst the Place Vendôme and Opéra Garnier in the 1st arrondissement, the Pavillon Cambon Capucines is a very central and convenient location to hold a large gala event. The space lends itself well to multiple layouts and number of guests, anywhere from 200-1200.

CAPACITIES
Salon Mewes (724 square meters)
800 reception / 610 seated
Salon Mewes + Mezzanine Mewes (1098 square meters)
1200 reception / 610 seated
Salon Capucines (90 square meters)
90 reception / 60 seated
Salon Castanier 1 (36 square meters)
35 reception / 20 seated
Salon Rossini (350 square meters)
350 theatre